gracekraft:

I’ve finally been given the ok to share the cover I did for the Steven Universe comic!  This one will be an exclusive for the very first issue!  So exciting~
For those of you who are interested in purchasing my cover variant, I’ve been told it will be available here to buy.

gracekraft:

I’ve finally been given the ok to share the cover I did for the Steven Universe comic!  This one will be an exclusive for the very first issue!  So exciting~

For those of you who are interested in purchasing my cover variant, I’ve been told it will be available here to buy.

All that said, it would be cool if Zimmy sneaked on board somehow and had a massive psychic freakout in the middle of the ocean

It’s Not Zimmy

  • Eyes not red
  • Skin not corpse-grey
  • Hair and nails maintained
  • Smile not at someone else’s expense
  • Gamma nowhere to be seen
  • Allowed onto an enclosed vessel in the middle of a wide ocean with hundreds of other students on board

Jack You Douchebag

Annie please accidentally call this new girl Zimmy. Please embarrass the fuck out of this tool

isomaru:

マザー風

isomaru:

マザー風

mechandra:

(do you ever just find yourself looking at Steven Universe stuff and suddenly realize you’re smiling?)

Anonymous said: So we know that from SMB that steven just moved in with the gems right, but I like to think that the gems used to babysit him. Like after Rose passed that it was maybe just to hard for the gems to take him in so whenever Greg had to work they would watch after him it wasn't until a few years ago that greg lost his home He had to have had a house considering all that stuff in his storage unit,that he asked the gems to take in steven he couldn't live in a van and stevens powers started to develop.

artemispanthar:

Aye, I agree, even though Steven has likely not been with the Gems his whole life, he’s most likely had regular contact with them. He’s very comfortable and familiar with them that it seems unlikely he was just suddenly thrown with them recently, even if Steven gets along well with everyone. They’re also very familiar and comfortable with him, like they’ve known him his whole life, but also with this distance that he wasn’t around enough to really know their way of life.

What I think is that as a baby they didn’t know if he’d have any Gem powers so they may’ve thought it best that he be raised like a human (and with his father) but of course the Gems would want to be in his life to some degree because they have a connection with him, so they may’ve visited or had Greg bring him over when they had time or something. I think that once he started displaying Gem powers is when his care switched hands from his father to the Gems, because his powers couldn’t be controlled so it was too dangerous for him to not have magical guidence. Also its probably easier to train him if they live with him. I don’t know how old Steven is except that he’s a “pre-pubescent adolescent” and the comic description said he was 12, so I’m thinking maybe as he gets closer to puberty his powers get activated. Maybe, I dunno, but he probably didn’t have powers as a young child.

I also think that Greg may’ve sold his house or vacated his apartment or wherever he lived when Steven went to go live with the Gems, and chose to live in his car so he could send more money for the care of Steven. I definitely agree there’s evidence that he used to live somewhere larger than his van because if he always lived in the van it’s unlikely he’d have so much stuff in the storage unit, especially since there’s a lot of mattresses, chairs, dressers, refrigerators, etc. House stuff. So he did not always live in a van (and I doubt he raised Steven in a van)

scullystorm:

maltedmilkchocolate:

kanthia:

raggediestandi:

itsvondell:

off-in-lala-land:

You know, if I was a parent, it would be at this point that I’d rip the game from his hands, stash it in my backpack, and force him to enjoy history goddamnit. This vacation cost a lot and the game is only for the hotel and travel time.

imagine trying to force someone to think that stonehenge is fun

"look kid we’re a ridiculous distance from a bunch of broken rocks how could you possibly be bored this is totally an appropriate vacation spot for someone this age."

Ah, fuck. Shit like this always gets to me, the tired old technophobe spiel and maybe it’s because it’s so rampant in my field (I work in outdoor education), but it just starts feeling so goddamn derivative after a while, nouveau hipsters who think the world is ending because kids play too many video games.
But what we’re missing is that this kid’s parents bought him his SP and a copy of Leaf Green (the employee at the game store said it would be perfect for him) so that he would shut up on the plane ride over and not bother them in the hotel, imagining that as soon as they touched down the kid would put the thing down and appreciate all the castles and grass and cafes and operas and rocks and ~*~culture~*~, because that’s what culture and history are, right? A bunch of old rocks.
What they missed is this kid staying up way past his bedtime the night before their plane flew out on message boards and chat rooms trying to find out which is the best starter, finally settled on a Squirtle and named it Rocky, and right now while his parents are appreciating rocks he and Rocky have got to save the whole world from Team Rocket because he’s a hero and that’s what heroes do and he’s so invested in this story and this world, he thinks he might have found the place where Machops live, why should he care about a guide droning on about Romans and a bunch of old people taking pictures?But please, go ahead and take the Gameboy from him, break it in half and remind him that you spent A LOT on this vacation, and HOW DARE HE. You will FORCE him to ENJOY his GODDAMN VACATION because it’s REAL LIFE. Wonder why he’s so upset, you’re the one who spent money on the thing? All he invested in it was time and emotion, and those things are definitely less important than money, when you’re eight. Wonder why he’s so disconnected from education, when you’ve managed to turn it into a punishment, a deprivation, a source of misery? Go on and repeat the tired old technophobe line until you’re red in the face, share it on Facebook and reblog it on Tumblr and retweet it on Twitter: nobody but you knows how to live ~*~REAL LIFE~*~ because we’re so busy exploring imaginary worlds.
Kids don’t just need to be taught when to use devices, we as their parents and guardians also need to be taught why they use devices. If a kid is more invested in Kanto than Stonehenge, why? How can we change our approach so kids ~*~appreciate real history~*~? And if not, can’t we just accept and appreciate that this kid will go back to the third grade, say “Yeah, I saw Stonehenge, it was neat, but who wants to trade a Haunter for my Machoke?”

I see this post come around a lot on my dash (though this response is a new one, and one i agree with). The thing with history is …. and no offense to tour guides… but it’s boring when it’s being told to you as straight facts. For adults I guess it’s okay, they understand this stuff, but for children it’s not like inviting? I live in the UK, I’m 22, i’ve been on a dozen holidays that had my family drive past Stonehenge, but never once have I had the chance to visit it. As a child, instead of adults telling me these are really old rocks, that were built by XYZ at the time. I got stories.I got told how the druids would use these stones for their practices. I got told these stones were a HUGE calender and when the stars came out, or the sun was in the right spot, you could tell the time and date. I got told alien conspiracy theories, and how the stones were used to tell aliens where to land. That Stonehenge was a place of magic and mystery. I was told amazing stories about how old they were, and all the things people believed they were used for.And as a child… things like that are SO exciting!! What’s cooler than thinking a space ship might land there, or that magical folk do magical things there?? If you introduce children to history, as plain fact… it is dull. You want to get children invested in a story, invested in a mystery. If your children can ‘interact’ with history, then it’s exciting, it’s entertaining, and most of all it’s fun. Combine fact and fiction, build up amazing stories, but still keep the truth in their, and children will want to know more. Who cares if they’re on their gameboy (years ago), or on a DS today? Modern gaming, and learning historical culture… they’re two very different forms of keeping your childs mind active. Games make you solve puzzles, build world, solve mysteries, and be the protagonists they want to be. History lets them know the world was full of crazy things, good and bad, and they’re not…too.. unlike the games we play. They’ve got benefits. Never force your child into something, but bring them into it in a way that benefits them. They can learn the dark sides, and boring sides of history as they get older, but for now, make it fun, make it interesting.How did those stones get there in the first place? Who was big enough, or smart enough to lift them up? Maybe it was aliens, or maybe it was just some very smart people who made equipment with wood? 

Coming from the mouth of a actual tour guide (I guide 4th graders [8-10 year olds] around Historic St. Mary’s City [Maryland’s 1st capitol] in the USA)…….ENGAGE THE KIDS! KNOW WHAT THEY LOVE? VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES! JOKE WITH THEM! GET TO KNOW THEM A BIT ALONG THE WAY! They are so fun to guide once you learn how to treat them!!!! I even started a game with them where, while we are walking to our next destination, I quiz them on what they learned at the last stop and THEY REALLY GET INTO IT AND HANDS WAVE FRANTICALLY IN THE AIR BECAUSE IT’S A FUN GAME! ;)

scullystorm:

maltedmilkchocolate:

kanthia:

raggediestandi:

itsvondell:

off-in-lala-land:

You know, if I was a parent, it would be at this point that I’d rip the game from his hands, stash it in my backpack, and force him to enjoy history goddamnit. This vacation cost a lot and the game is only for the hotel and travel time.

imagine trying to force someone to think that stonehenge is fun

"look kid we’re a ridiculous distance from a bunch of broken rocks how could you possibly be bored this is totally an appropriate vacation spot for someone this age."

Ah, fuck. Shit like this always gets to me, the tired old technophobe spiel and maybe it’s because it’s so rampant in my field (I work in outdoor education), but it just starts feeling so goddamn derivative after a while, nouveau hipsters who think the world is ending because kids play too many video games.

But what we’re missing is that this kid’s parents bought him his SP and a copy of Leaf Green (the employee at the game store said it would be perfect for him) so that he would shut up on the plane ride over and not bother them in the hotel, imagining that as soon as they touched down the kid would put the thing down and appreciate all the castles and grass and cafes and operas and rocks and ~*~culture~*~, because that’s what culture and history are, right? A bunch of old rocks.

What they missed is this kid staying up way past his bedtime the night before their plane flew out on message boards and chat rooms trying to find out which is the best starter, finally settled on a Squirtle and named it Rocky, and right now while his parents are appreciating rocks he and Rocky have got to save the whole world from Team Rocket because he’s a hero and that’s what heroes do and he’s so invested in this story and this world, he thinks he might have found the place where Machops live, why should he care about a guide droning on about Romans and a bunch of old people taking pictures?

But please, go ahead and take the Gameboy from him, break it in half and remind him that you spent A LOT on this vacation, and HOW DARE HE. You will FORCE him to ENJOY his GODDAMN VACATION because it’s REAL LIFE. Wonder why he’s so upset, you’re the one who spent money on the thing? All he invested in it was time and emotion, and those things are definitely less important than money, when you’re eight. Wonder why he’s so disconnected from education, when you’ve managed to turn it into a punishment, a deprivation, a source of misery? Go on and repeat the tired old technophobe line until you’re red in the face, share it on Facebook and reblog it on Tumblr and retweet it on Twitter: nobody but you knows how to live ~*~REAL LIFE~*~ because we’re so busy exploring imaginary worlds.

Kids don’t just need to be taught when to use devices, we as their parents and guardians also need to be taught why they use devices. If a kid is more invested in Kanto than Stonehenge, why? How can we change our approach so kids ~*~appreciate real history~*~? And if not, can’t we just accept and appreciate that this kid will go back to the third grade, say “Yeah, I saw Stonehenge, it was neat, but who wants to trade a Haunter for my Machoke?”

I see this post come around a lot on my dash (though this response is a new one, and one i agree with). 

The thing with history is …. and no offense to tour guides… but it’s boring when it’s being told to you as straight facts. 

For adults I guess it’s okay, they understand this stuff, but for children it’s not like inviting? 

I live in the UK, I’m 22, i’ve been on a dozen holidays that had my family drive past Stonehenge, but never once have I had the chance to visit it. 

As a child, instead of adults telling me these are really old rocks, that were built by XYZ at the time. I got stories.

I got told how the druids would use these stones for their practices. I got told these stones were a HUGE calender and when the stars came out, or the sun was in the right spot, you could tell the time and date. 

I got told alien conspiracy theories, and how the stones were used to tell aliens where to land. That Stonehenge was a place of magic and mystery. 

I was told amazing stories about how old they were, and all the things people believed they were used for.

And as a child… things like that are SO exciting!! What’s cooler than thinking a space ship might land there, or that magical folk do magical things there?? 

If you introduce children to history, as plain fact… it is dull. You want to get children invested in a story, invested in a mystery. If your children can ‘interact’ with history, then it’s exciting, it’s entertaining, and most of all it’s fun. 

Combine fact and fiction, build up amazing stories, but still keep the truth in their, and children will want to know more. 

Who cares if they’re on their gameboy (years ago), or on a DS today? Modern gaming, and learning historical culture… they’re two very different forms of keeping your childs mind active. Games make you solve puzzles, build world, solve mysteries, and be the protagonists they want to be. 

History lets them know the world was full of crazy things, good and bad, and they’re not…too.. unlike the games we play. 

They’ve got benefits. Never force your child into something, but bring them into it in a way that benefits them. They can learn the dark sides, and boring sides of history as they get older, but for now, make it fun, make it interesting.

How did those stones get there in the first place? Who was big enough, or smart enough to lift them up? Maybe it was aliens, or maybe it was just some very smart people who made equipment with wood? 

Coming from the mouth of a actual tour guide (I guide 4th graders [8-10 year olds] around Historic St. Mary’s City [Maryland’s 1st capitol] in the USA)…….ENGAGE THE KIDS! KNOW WHAT THEY LOVE? VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES! JOKE WITH THEM! GET TO KNOW THEM A BIT ALONG THE WAY! They are so fun to guide once you learn how to treat them!!!! I even started a game with them where, while we are walking to our next destination, I quiz them on what they learned at the last stop and THEY REALLY GET INTO IT AND HANDS WAVE FRANTICALLY IN THE AIR BECAUSE IT’S A FUN GAME! ;)

(Source: plainpictures, via optimisticduelist)

Pearl put that bandage on Steven’s face, didn’t she

gracekraft:

Some good R&R in the Sugilite aftermath

gracekraft:

Some good R&R in the Sugilite aftermath